Swamp Thing, Vol. 8: Spontaneous Generation

Swamp Thing Vol Spontaneous Generation After his joyful reunion with his beloved Abby SWAMP THING once known as Alec Holland must now face the consequences of his long journey through space A new Swamp Thing is being born and the old m

  • Title: Swamp Thing, Vol. 8: Spontaneous Generation
  • Author: Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá
  • ISBN: 9781401207939
  • Page: 129
  • Format: Paperback
  • After his joyful reunion with his beloved Abby, SWAMP THING, once known as Alec Holland, must now face the consequences of his long journey through space A new Swamp Thing is being born, and the old must make a decision destroy it and maintain his supremacy, or allow it to be born, and risk the destruction of the Green.

    • Swamp Thing, Vol. 8: Spontaneous Generation BY Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá
      129 Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá
    • thumbnail Title: Swamp Thing, Vol. 8: Spontaneous Generation BY Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá
      Posted by:Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá
      Published :2019-04-24T02:43:11+00:00


    About “Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá

    • Rick Veitch Alfredo Alcalá

      Richard Rick Veitch is an American comics artist and writer who has worked in mainstream, underground, and alternative comics.



    142 thoughts on “Swamp Thing, Vol. 8: Spontaneous Generation

    • I'm enjoying this a lot more than I remembered and have come to the conclusion that the Rick Veitch is very underrated, though I've yet to reread the confusing time-travel arc. Veitch manages to strike a good balance between plot (adventure, character development, lots of elementals introduced, subplots galore) and prose (including deep ecology philosophising). He also does all the art (!!), which is less gritty and horrific than the Bissette/Totleben stories, but still really detailed and with [...]


    • I wasn't sure what to think of Veitch's first few stories for Swamp Thing, not easy following Moore's previous run but I persevered in order to read it in parallel with Delano's run on Hellblazer. At this point they are practically a single strip and the main plot is woven across either series. I'm glad I did because this book goes from strength to strength, I'm still not 100% on some of his interpretations of the plot elements Moore had invented but there's plenty of Constantine for your buck.


    • It's hard to tell a comicbook about a superhero without punching. But that's what the Swamp Thing expects to be. Here, there's a lot of trippy religious talk. I don't think it ultimately comes together, although it's a good experiment. It looks like DC stopped collecting this book after the Veitch run -- just like it stopped collecting Shade the Changing Man and Doom Patrol. Collect everything, spare nothing.


    • I probably should not have started in volume 8. I was lost a lot during this story. I would call this the most "grotesque" graphic novel I have finished in my life. It was earthy and bizarre and gritty and awkward all at the same time, yet I was hooked anyway. I may or may not read further titles.



    • Loosing patience with Abby and Alec. If Constantine wasn't in this (and it wasn't directly interwining with Hellblazer) I would have quit reading it. Chester is also awesome.


    • Not exactly Alan Moore, but almost up to his standard. Very trippy, with some fantastic art and moral reckonings.



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