Companion Grasses

Companion Grasses These adventurous poems search for answers about what it means to dwell in a particular place Exploring the cities coasts forests and mountains of Northern California and New England the poems in

  • Title: Companion Grasses
  • Author: Brian Teare
  • ISBN: 9781890650797
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Paperback
  • These adventurous poems search for answers about what it means to dwell in a particular place Exploring the cities, coasts, forests, and mountains of Northern California and New England, the poems in this collection immerse themselves in the specifics of bioregion and microclimate, and take special note of the cycle of death and rebirth that plays out dramatically in CaliThese adventurous poems search for answers about what it means to dwell in a particular place Exploring the cities, coasts, forests, and mountains of Northern California and New England, the poems in this collection immerse themselves in the specifics of bioregion and microclimate, and take special note of the cycle of death and rebirth that plays out dramatically in California s chaparral and grasslands Inspired by Transcendentalism, Companion Grasses sees the sacred in the workings of the material world, but its indebtedness to the ecological tradition of California poets unearths evidence in the sensual materiality of words themselves Creating ecologically rich landscapes and highly rhythmic inscapes, the poems set seasonal and human dramas side by side and assess their relationship.

    Companion Grasses Brian Teare Inspired by Transcendentalism, Companion Grasses sees the sacred in the workings of the material world, but its indebtedness to the ecological tradition of California poets unearths evidence in the sensual materiality of words themselves Creating ecologically rich landscapes and highly rhythmic inscapes, the poems set seasonal and human dramas side by side and assess their relationship. Great Ornamental Grasses as Companion Plants for Your Great Ornamental Grasses as Companion Plants for Your Succulents Succulent Gardens, Companion Plants Prized by gardeners for their architectural shapes, fascinating textures, vibrant colors, drought resistance and low maintenance, succulents are Companion Plants for Ornamental Grasses dianeseeds Companion Plants for Short Ornamental Grasses These flowers are useful for edging, or for planting in the rock garden, along with grasses that grow tall like Blue Fescue, Prairie Dropseed and Sedge African Daisy Drought tolerant annual with brightly colored flowers. Companion Grasses by Brian Teare Companion Grasses is a good book of poems, even a great book of poems, but perhaps not my favorite book of poems There were some poems I absolutely adored There were some poems I absolutely adored Quakinggrass, Star Thistle, and Atlas Peak are my three favorite poems, all incredibly inventive, observant, and sensitive. Full Sun Companion Plants to Grasses and Day Lilies Home Full Sun Companion Plants to Grasses and Day Lilies Butterfly Attracting Companions Coneflowers Wet Soil Companions Some gardeners choose day lilies for their ability to tolerate soggy soils Drought Tolerant Companions Day lilies have plump storage roots allowing them to store water Companion GrassesBrian Teare Omnidawn So if Companion Grasses is a philosophical meditation on place, an autobiographical record of the erotic and the elegiac, and, finally, a testament of an ecological consciousness, I hope its forms not only register these shifts in diction and in subject but also my own interior response to these shifts, ecstatic and sorrowing and shaken.

    • Companion Grasses >> Brian Teare
      435 Brian Teare
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      Posted by:Brian Teare
      Published :2019-05-08T14:36:44+00:00


    About “Brian Teare

    • Brian Teare

      A former National Endowment for the Arts fellow, Brian Teare is the recipient of poetry fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the American Antiquarian Society, the Fund for Poetry, and the Headlands Center for the Arts He is the author of The Room Where I Was Born, Sight Map, the Lambda award winning Pleasure, and Companion Grasses, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award His fifth book, The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven, will be out from Ahsahta in September 2015 After over a decade of teaching and writing in the San Francisco Bay area, he is now an Assistant Professor at Temple University, and lives in Philadelphia, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.



    448 thoughts on “Companion Grasses

    • Brian Teare is an extremely gifted samabitch, that at times I suspect he shows off just because he can. The first two sections are very polished, to the point wherein the poems begin to feel synthetic. His overall obsession with language as both medium and site, although impressive, can be disengaging.However, the last two poems, "To begin with desire" and Star Thistle, written for his father and his friend (the poet Reginald Shepard) respectively, are clear exceptions. These poems are distinct [...]


    • Companion to whom, without wince—what desire? Into the light of solitude, there is refraction. “A beach without moon/mere rumor,” Brian Teare’s entry poem “White Graphite” composed of perfectly clipped couplets, inseparable stanzas, no end stops, draws the reader (as if in homage to Whitman’s Leaves of Grass) “onward and outward” (wherein) “nothing collapses”… and “the smallest sprout shows there really is no death.” Teare’s poems in Companion Grasses grow anew, tuf [...]


    • Companion Grasses is a good book of poems, even a great book of poems, but perhaps not my favorite book of poems. There were some poems I absolutely adored. "Quakinggrass", "Star Thistle," and "Atlas Peak" are my three favorite poems, all incredibly inventive, observant, and sensitive. Unfortunately, I didn't love "Transcendental Grammar Crown", which makes up the entire second section of the book and found there (especially in that poem) to be just a little too much Emerson and Thoreau working [...]


    • I received Teare's book for Christmas because it was on a 2013 must-read poetry collection list and got around to incorporating it into my daily reading almost three years later. After reading it, I agree with its placement on that list. It also created a nice contrast to the Milosz anthology of which I've been giving myself simultaneous doses. Teare is nothing like Milosz in form; he often abandons capitalization, punctuation, and left-alignment. Still, the images are rustic in both without see [...]


    • The title is meant to invoke Whitman's amative love, and the orders of the poem of male companionship and influence. However, the orders returned to, again and again, are not the identity politics of Seventies lesbian feminism, which drew Teare into poetry, but the eco-poetics of the New England Transcendentalists, and the elegaic mode of "to say goodbye is specific | as the node where grass branches and stem | intends inflorescence" -- that last word is probably the volume's favorite. The exper [...]


    • Formalistic monomania has its rewards, when paired with a sensitive intelligence: first, in the first half of the book, you don't know where the music keeps slipping off to. But that's the thing with this book: it's still there, but pieces of rhythm and song have fallen between (been erased by) the blank cracks and chasms separating the words and sentence fragments in each poem (or, they hang on for dear life in a few places; thin, tenuous threads barely keeping certain relations together). It's [...]


    • imagination endseach day in pre-fabruin Americathis place that outlivesits own demise(from "Susurrus Stanzas")This book is like a field guide to many kinds of grief-- grief over the loss of specific people (there are poems dedicated to the poet's late father and also the poet Reginald Shepherd, who died in 2008) but also I read them as elegies for the natural world and the individual's relation to it:nothing else can grow --you would know is it soul the ferninterrupts itself to reproduce it is e [...]


    • Brian Teare's book is an instant delight for any reader who enjoys a good Whitman, Heidegger, or Thoreau reference. In fact, they underscore a good deal of this collection. Although there were particular poems saturated with latin or prosaic vocabulary, others welcomed simplistic verse; given the nature of Teare's educational background, I'd have to allow some leeway as his knowledge is definitely expansive. If anything, the last poem "Star Thistle" makes the collection well worth a read. "if we [...]


    • Are veins of blood so different from tributaries of rivers? Is the way grass in the wind might blow dark on one side, and flip to silver on the other so different from the way we might turn a dark thought in our heads to see the brighter aspect from another perspective?Briane Teare’s fifth full-length book of poetry, Companion Grasses, offers a new perspective on the human relationship with nature.Ready my review here on the incomparable Litseen: litseen/?p=13264


    • This is a beautiful, solid collection of poetry. The voice is very clear and strong, and the rhythm of the language, once you fall into it, is hypnotizing. The imagery is so lush, I could see, feel, smell the places Teare conjures. There are cycles of death and rebirth here, on the human level, and on the more-than-human level. A wonderful book!


    • What a truly bizarre collection - but I also really enjoyed it, and especially once getting some background on some of the poems. The presentation and layout/style of the book is really interesting and inviting, even if the meaning behind the poems are not overt.




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